Increased sensitivity of antigen-experienced T cells through the enrichment of oligomeric T cell receptor complexes Immunity. Increased sensitivity of antigen-experienced T cells through the enrichment of oligomeric T cell receptor complexes Immunity.Kumar R, Ferez M, Swamy M, Arechaga I, Rejas MT, Valpuesta JM, Schamel WW, Alarcón B, van Santen HM Immunity 2011, 35(3), 375-87. DOI:10.1016/j.immuni.2011.08.010. 2011-10-12T22:00:00Z<p style="text-align:justify;"><span class="ms-rteThemeForeColor-2-5 ms-rteThemeFontFace-1 ms-rteFontSize-2">​<span style="font-weight:bold;">Abstract</span></span></p><div style="color:#000000;font-family:arial, helvetica, clean, sans-serif;text-align:justify;"><p style="margin-bottom:0.5em;font-size:1.04em;"><span class="ms-rteThemeFontFace-1 ms-rteFontSize-2">Although memory T cells respond more vigorously to stimulation and they are more sensitive to low doses of antigen than naive T cells, the molecular basis of this increased sensitivity remains unclear. We have previously shown that the T cell receptor (TCR) exists as different-sized oligomers on the surface of resting T cells and that large oligomers are preferentially activated in response to low antigen doses. Through biochemistry and electron microscopy, we now showed that previously stimulated and memory T cells have more and larger TCR oligomers at the cell surface than their naive counterparts. Reconstitution of cells and mice with a point mutant of the CD3ζ subunit, which impairs TCR oligomer formation, demonstrated that the increased size of TCR oligomers was directly responsible for the increased sensitivity of antigen-experienced T cells. Thus, we propose that an "avidity maturation" mechanism underlies T cell antigenic memory.</span><br></p></div><p><a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21903423">​[pubmed]</a><br></p>28