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Grip strength, neurocognition, and social functioning in people witht type-2 diabetes mellitus, major depressive disorder, bipolar disorder, and schizophrenia

Abstract: Background: Frailty is a common syndrome among older adults and patients with several comorbidities. Grip strength (GS) is a representative parameter of frailty because it is a valid indicator of current and long-term physical conditions in the general population and patients with severe mental illnesses (SMIs). Physical and cognitive capacities of people with SMIs are usually impaired; however, their relationship with frailty or social functioning have not been studied to date. The current study aimed to determine if GS is a valid predictor of changes in cognitive performance and social functioning in patients with type-2 diabetes mellitus and SMIs. Methods: Assessments of social functioning, cognitive performance, and GS (measured with an electronic dynamometer) were conducted in 30 outpatients with type 2 diabetes mellitus, 35 with major depressive disorder, 42 with bipolar disorder, 30 with schizophrenia, and 28 healthy controls, twice during 1-year, follow-up period. Descriptive analyses were conducted using a one-way analysis of variance for continuous variables and the chi-squared test for categorical variables. Differences between groups for the motor, cognitive, and social variables at T1 and T2 were assessed using a one-way analysis of covariance, with sex and age as co-variates (p < 0.01). To test the predictive capacity of GS at baseline to explain the variance in cognitive performance and social functioning at T2, a linear regression analysis was performed (p < 0.05). Results: Predictive relationships were found among GS when implicated with clinical, cognitive, and social variables. These relationships explained changes in cognitive performance after one year of follow-up; the variability percentage was 67.7%, in patients with type-2 diabetes mellitus and 89.1% in patients with schizophrenia. Baseline GS along with other variables, also predicted changes in social functioning in major depressive disorder, bipolar disorder, and schizophrenia, with variability percentages of 67.3, 36, and 59%, respectively. Conclusion: GS combined with other variables significantly predicted changes in cognitive performance and social functioning in people with SMIs or type-2 diabetes mellitus. Interventions aimed to improve the overall physical conditions of patients who have poor GS could be a therapeutic option that confers positive effects on cognitive performance and social functioning.

 Fuente: Frontiers in Psychology, 2020, 11, 525231

Editorial: Frontiers Media

 Año de publicación: 2020

Nº de páginas: 12

Tipo de publicación: Artículo de Revista

 DOI: 10.3389/fpsyg.2020.525231

ISSN: 1664-1078

Url de la publicación: https://doi.org/10.3389/fpsyg.2020.525231

Autoría

ALIÑO-DIES, MARÍA

SÁNCHEZ-ORTÍ, JOAN VICENT

CORREA-GHISAYS, PATRICIA

BALANZÁ-MARTÍNEZ, VICENT

VILA-FRANCÉS, JOAN

SELVA-VERA, GABRIEL

CORREA-ESTRADA, PAULINA

FORÉS-MARTOS, JAUME

SAN-MARTÍN VALENZUELA, CONSTANZA

MONFORT-PAÑEGO, MANUEL

MARIA ROSA AYESA ARRIOLA

MIGUEL RUIZ VEGUILLA

BENEDICTO CRESPO FACORRO

RAFAEL TABARES SEISDEDOS