Hox genes regulate digit patterning by controlling the wavelength of a Turing-type mechanism.Hox genes regulate digit patterning by controlling the wavelength of a Turing-type mechanism.Sheth R, Marcon L, Bastida MF, Junco M, Quintana L, Dahn R, Kmita M, Sharpe J, Ros MA.2012-12-13T23:00:00Z<p style="text-align:justify;"><span class="ms-rteThemeForeColor-2-5 ms-rteThemeFontFace-1 ms-rteFontSize-2">​<span style="font-weight:bold;">Abstract</span></span></p><div style="color:#000000;text-align:justify;"><p style="margin-bottom:0.5em;"><span class="ms-rteThemeFontFace-1 ms-rteFontSize-2">The formation of repetitive structures (such as stripes) in nature is often consistent with a reaction-diffusion mechanism, or Turing model, of self-organizing systems. We used mouse genetics to analyze how digit patterning (an iterative digit/nondigit pattern) is generated. We showed that the progressive reduction in Hoxa13 and Hoxd11-Hoxd13 genes (hereafter referred to as distal Hox genes) from the Gli3-null background results in progressively more severe polydactyly, displaying thinner and densely packed digits. Combined with computer modeling, our results argue for a Turing-type mechanism underlying digit patterning, in which the dose of distal Hox genes modulates the digit period or wavelength. The phenotypic similarity with fish-fin endoskeleton patterns suggests that the pentadactyl state has been achieved through modification of an ancestral Turing-type mechanism.<br></span></p></div><p><span class="ms-rteThemeFontFace-1 ms-rteFontSize-2"></span><a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23239739"><span class="ms-rteThemeFontFace-1 ms-rteFontSize-2 ms-rteThemeForeColor-5-0" style="">​Science. 2012 Dec 14;338(6113):1476-80.</span></a><span style="color:#000000;font-family:-webkit-standard;font-size:medium;"></span><br></p>219