Molecular motors in bacterial secretion.Molecular motors in bacterial secretion.Peña A, Arechaga I. J Mol Microbiol Biotechnol. 2013;23(4-5):357-69. doi: 10.1159/000351360. 2013-07-31T22:00:00Z<p style="text-align:justify;"><span class="ms-rteThemeFontFace-1 ms-rteFontSize-2"><span class="ms-rteThemeForeColor-2-5 ms-rteThemeFontFace-1 ms-rteFontSize-2" style="font-weight:bold;">Abstract</span><br></span></p><div style="color:#000000;font-family:arial, helvetica, clean, sans-serif;text-align:justify;"><p style="margin-bottom:0.5em;font-size:1.04em;"><span class="ms-rteThemeFontFace-1 ms-rteFontSize-2">Secretion of effectors across bacterial membranes is usually mediated by large multisubunit complexes. In most cases, the secreted effectors are virulent factors normally associated to pathogenic diseases. The biogenesis of these secretion systems and the transport of the effectors are processes that require energy. This energy could be directly obtained by using the proton motive force, but in most cases the energy associated to these processes is derived from ATP hydrolysis. Here, a description of the machineries involved in generating the energy required for system biogenesis and substrate transport by type II, III and IV secretion systems is provided, with special emphasis on highlighting the structural similarities and evolutionary relationships among the secretion ATPases.</span><br></p></div><p>​<span style="color:#474f51;font-family:"yanone kaffeesatz";font-size:18px;background-color:#ffffff;">[</span><a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23920498" style="color:#ed391b;margin:0px;padding:0px;border:0px;font-stretch:inherit;font-size:18px;line-height:inherit;font-family:"yanone kaffeesatz";vertical-align:baseline;background-color:#ffffff;">pubmed</a><span style="color:#474f51;font-family:"yanone kaffeesatz";font-size:18px;background-color:#ffffff;">]</span><br></p>22